How to Encourage Employee Attendance at Work?

Posted on October 17th, 2016 in Employee Monitoring, PC Tracking Software | Comments Off on How to Encourage Employee Attendance at Work?

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Attendance is critical in many customer-facing jobs. Poor attendance saps employee morale, costs employers overtime expenses, and reduces employee engagement. Poor attendance takes supervisory time and attention and often results in disciplinary action.

You can manage employee attendance to reduce attendance problems. Here’s how to manage and encourage attendance. Use these steps to encourage employee attendance at work.

5 steps to Encourage Employee Attendance
First, you must have a way to track the time people take off from work so that the integrity of your Paid Time Off (PTO) policy, your sick leave policy, and / or your paid vacation policy is ensured. This also ensures that the time off rules are the same for everyone which is important for the sense of workplace fairness and justice.

This is especially important to manage unscheduled absences for which many workplaces have trouble with work coverage. Encouraging employee attendance is important for any customer facing workstation. Attendance is also critical when one employee’s work is dependent on the work of the prior employee in jobs such as manufacturing or assembling products.

Teachers, customer support specialists, technical support providers, health care professionals, and other direct service employees are examples of employees who have workstations that employees must staff on a daily basis.

Otherwise, employers are at a loss to schedule and find staff replacements to do their work.

Second, you need to manage absenteeism and encourage employee attendance. This means that the employee needs to call in directly to the supervisor who is trained to manage absenteeism.

This starts with the personal call and the supervisor telling the employee that he or she will be missed and describing the impact of their absence on the workplace.

Each absence ends with the supervisor personally welcoming the employee back to work, encouraging employee attendance in the future, and once again, emphasizing the impact of the employee’s absence on the workplace and their coworkers.

You are not holding this conversation in a blaming tone of voice – after all, many employee absences are legitimate – you are genuinely welcoming the employee back to work and reinforcing the impact of an unscheduled absence.

Third, if possible, allow flexibility with schedules in your workplace so that an employee with an early doctor’s appointment or a sick child, as examples, can work later or come earlier to make up the time.

Women, unfortunately, according to U.S. Department of Labor figures, experience more attendance problems related to family matters. Especially single moms, who have no safety net of family or a partner to help with child-care related issues, struggle with attendance, in my experience.
So, this workplace flexibility might also include the ability to share jobs, schedule flexible days or hours, and work from home, or telecommute, under guidelines. I’m not a huge fan of compensatory or comp time because I believe it encourages a clock-watching attitude. This is not in keeping with the mindset of accomplishing the whole job and goals that I look for in an exempt or salaried employee. But, exempt jobs are also the jobs that will most frequently allow flexibility for the employee and the employer.

Fourth, rewards and recognition for positive employee attendance can make a difference. While you don’t want people feeling as if their employer must pay them extra for doing their job, you do want them to know that you appreciate and respect their positive attendance.

In some cases, especially with non-exempt employees, and to reduce unscheduled absences, you may want to build actual monetary rewards into your employee attendance policy.

Too many attendance policies focus on the punishment side of the equation. More emphasis on rewards for positive attendance might give you more bang for your bucks. Nevertheless, an attendance policy must focus on both.

Finally, and probably most importantly, you need a management system which can help you tracking your employees attendance. You may have a large number of employees and that is very difficult to make sure every one will be tracked properly.  The tracking software like iMonitor WorkAuditor can help you a lot. The turn-on and turn-off of employees will be recorded as clock-in and clock-off information. The employees working idle time, active time can be recorded also.

iMonitor WorkAuditor is not only the tools that can help you tracking, further more, it’s a management software could control and supervise employees behavior without invasion of privacy.

Progressive discipline is critical, starting with coaching and feedback, and performing the steps in attendance management listed above. Your attending employees will thank you.

You can more effectively manage attendance if you follow these steps to reduce absenteeism

How To Tell A New Employee ‘Your Work Isn’t Up To Par’

Posted on August 4th, 2016 in anywheremonitor, Employee Monitoring, IMonitor Softwares | Comments Off on How To Tell A New Employee ‘Your Work Isn’t Up To Par’

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Let’s face it – the hiring process can be a nightmare. Sorting the wheat from the chaff is an incredibly time-consuming task and there’s no guarantee that you won’t wind up getting burned after hiring a new employee. And that’s not even taking into account the financial impact of turnover and training costs!

Make sure your employees never quit. Download this free eBook that highlights 6 keys to unlocking your employees potential and guaranteeing long-term success!
The bottom line is that you should try to keep good employees whenever you can. But sometimes, for various reasons, those good employees quit. If you aren’t paying attention, a situation like that can catch you unaware and leave you in a very tight spot. If you know the warning signs to look for, you can spot employees who are thinking about quitting before they’ve even made up their minds.

There are three common culprits for sub-standard work—lack of professionalism, gaps in training or skills, and wrong instinct. Identify which issue is plaguing your new hire, then begin a productive discussion with these suggestions on how to tackle each one.

1. Professionalism
Issues of professionalism are the quickest to spot. They mar otherwise well-researched, well-thought out work with nuisances—e.g., your marketing coordinator’s presentation was good, but she was 15 minutes late, or an otherwise solid press release is full of typos.

Whatever the reason—maybe your employee is overwhelmed, or perhaps she doesn’t really grasp the consequences of flouting protocol—the best approach here is to be straightforward, and tell the employee that her great work is being overshadowed by issues of professionalism.

Where possible, point to the work as the issue, not the employee herself, and explain in detail why the issue is a problem. For example, “That press release was fantastic—you really grasped what’s newsworthy about the event. But for an editor to take it seriously, the grammar needs to be impeccable, and I noticed several issues in this document.”

For more personal issues, you can also emphasize the relationship between professionalism and advancement. Begin the conversation by talking about someone in a senior role, and discuss how she’s known for being the grammar guru or the first one to arrive for a meeting. Making the conversation about someone who “gets it” is a way to talk through expectations without putting the employee on the defensive. By covering how professionalism adds to your opinion of a colleague, you’ll also be addressing how it detracts when missing.

2. Training
At my last job, each new employee had to endure an hours-long training on a donor management system during the first week on the job. But, let’s face it—while it was important to learn that software, the nuances of training didn’t always stick (which our boss would discover when an important donor disappeared from the system or was called twice by two different people).

It happens. So, if your new employee seems to be lacking skills he was supposed to learn on the job—the phone system, the database, whatever—schedule a one-on-one refresher to walk him through any FAQs. Approach this discussion from the “we’ve all been there” perspective (and maybe lighten the mood with a story about a mistake of your own). But this time, as you go through the training, highlight why paying attention to specifics matters (e.g., “As you see, we group members by the year they joined, so it’s crucial to input the date right away”).

Of course, if the employee doesn’t have the skills you expected him to come in with (i.e. the “social media expert” only knows Facebook and Twitter or the “Excel whiz” only knows basic functions), you have a bigger problem. Begin this discussion by saying that the first month on a job is the best time to ask questions and get training to fill in gaps, then bring up the specific issue: “I noticed the monthly report you turned in was a basic spreadsheet, but we typically use pivot tables for these. I was assuming you knew how to do that, but if not, I’d be happy to sign you up for some additional training.” Let him know you’re there as a resource for training or questions, but also be clear that you expect he’ll be working on and off the clock to get his skills up to speed.

3. Instinct
Has the new hire who touted his networking skills spent his first few events in the corner? Is he hard-selling a client you’d take a kid-gloves approach with?

This discussion is the trickiest, because you can end up coming off as a “my way or the highway” boss when addressing it. So, the first step is to ask yourself if that is in fact the case: Are you asking your sales reps to stick to phone calls over emails because of their success rate, or because that’s how you’ve always done it?

If it’s not a matter of innovation, but one of culture or effectiveness, you must get your new hire on the same page. Begin the conversation by asking him why he approached a situation a certain way. For example, “I noticed that you were really hard-selling Al in the sales meeting today. Why did you take that approach?” This will give you a better idea of where you need to course-correct: Is he being authoritative because he feels no one is listening to the new guy, or does he have no idea how he’s coming off?

Then, be sympathetic, but fill him in on “how things are done” from the viewpoint of the desired outcome. “I know it seems like that’s a great way to get him on board, but with these types of clients, we typically take another approach.” Then, explain why. By sharing not only what to do, but also why it’s a best practice, he’ll have a foundation for the next time he’s thinking on his feet.

I know: There are some discussions that are simply never going to be easy for the person on either side of the desk. But remember, by nipping problems in the bud, you’re helping your employee get on the right track—and that will decrease the need for these tough talks in the future.

Another thing is as the employer,we need to know the information of employees’ working. Some computer monitoring software may help you, with the computer monitoring software , we can know what the employees were doing and how they were doing, then we can know better about our employees, about our company.

A Watchful Eye: Software Tool for Remote Employee Monitoring

Posted on July 19th, 2016 in EAM Professional Edition, Employee Monitoring, IMonitor Softwares | Comments Off on A Watchful Eye: Software Tool for Remote Employee Monitoring

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With the need for Internet access at work, increasingly companies find that monitoring what their workers are doing during work hours is a necessity rather than a mere extreme measure of security.

The addition of people who work from home to the workforce and an increased need to see that proprietary or sensitive information and client details are not accidentally or maliciously leaked also mean that companies these days need tools to monitor what their employees do during company time.

This isn’t just restricted to monitoring what websites employees may visit or whether they are on social media or YouTube.

It also means that employers know what projects have been assigned to which employees and how much time is being spent on such projects and can figure out methods to improve their productivity.

So, without further ado, here is a tool that help employers with remote employee monitoring.

iMonitor EAM
If you don’t want to get too intrusive when it comes to monitoring your workers and their productivity, but you still want to keep tabs on their productivity and what they’re doing while on the company’s time, this software is something you should look into. Also, if you find it difficult to utilize monitoring software data to improve employee performance, iMonitor EAM again can help.

The software monitors productive and non-productive time by monitoring how much time an employee spends on which applications. You can decide and enter into the software what applications are needed and productive. It shows you the productive and non-productive time in terms of bar graphs which are easy to  shows active or productive time and non-productive time.

In addition, many companies have resorted to use those simple employee monitoring software to not only manage but also monitor employees, track the time spent on projects, especially by part-timers or workers in remote locations, and how much work they have already done.

Increasingly, companies are coming to realize that merely blocking certain websites or even taking screenshots isn’t enough. If they are truly interested in improving worker productivity and reducing the amount of time that employees spends on non-productive activities, they need more.

They need to make sure employees are not stretching out the time spent on a particular task, that they aren’t accessing anything that could be deemed objectionable by other workers, that their clients’ information or any proprietary information is not compromised and that the company’s systems aren’t left vulnerable to malware and data theft because of the websites that the employees may have unwittingly visited. As such, an increased need for remote employee monitoring is definitely understandable.

You Really Are Being Watched!

Posted on July 15th, 2016 in Employee Monitoring, Mac Keylogger, Power Keylogger | Comments Off on You Really Are Being Watched!

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It’s possible that someone has been reading your e-mails, listening to your phone calls, and tracking your Internet use. No, it’s not a foreign spy. It’s not even your ex—it’s your employer. And she doesn’t even need to tell you she’s doing it.

Employers can legally monitor their workers however they want. They can log and review all computer activity as long as they own the machines. The most popular method of keeping tabs on employees is to track Internet use: A whopping 66 percent of companies monitor employee Internet activity, according to a survey released in February by the American Management Association and the ePolicy Institute. What are they looking for? Frequent visits to sexually explicit sites, game sites, and social-networking sites like Facebook on company time. Almost a third of those who said they monitor their employees have fired someone for inappropriate Web surfing.

Some companies monitor employees—tracking keystrokes, reviewing computer files, and reading e-mail—to ensure they’re staying loyal. Press leaks of confidential information and trade secrets are of legitimate concern to employers, and many will go to great lengths to make sure that their employees aren’t using company computers to pass on information to outside sources.

How They Do It

Most employers who monitor their workers use software loaded directly onto the workstations. Some applications are meant to monitor the Internet traffic of entire enterprises. There is no shortage of such software available for purchase by both companies and individuals. Programs like  can keep detailed logs of keystrokes and SMTP and POP sessions, screenshots, instant messages, and URLs visited on individual computers. some keylogger software can also be programmed to inform users at start-up that their computers are being monitored—a handy tool that can keep an employer in the legal clear.

Employee monitoring is, for the most part, completely legal. Only two states—Delaware and Connecticut—require employers to notify employees of monitoring. But most employers do (and should) make a point of alerting employees to surveillance, in order to avoid the fuzzy legal and ethical boundaries surrounding electronic privacy in the workplace. Of those surveyed who monitor their employees, 83 percent said they inform them that they’re doing it.

But not every company informs employees of its actions when it should, which can lead to serious trouble. Case in point: Hewlett-Packard. In 2006, HP hired private investigators to help find the source of information leaks. They used slimy—but legal—tactics such as digging through trash, sending fake e-mails loaded with hidden tracking software, and tailing journalists who were communicating with HP employees. They crossed the legal line when they used pretexting, or posing as someone else in order to get phone records. The chairman of HP and half a dozen board members resigned or were fired as a result, and the entire debacle shed new light on the possibilities of employee monitoring in the digital age.

E-mail monitoring can be particularly tricky. Employers can look through old e-mail, but monitoring e-mails in real time as they come in and out is still a gray legal area. An employer may intercept communications where there is actual or implied employee consent. Implied consent has been found where the employer simply gave notice of the monitoring. The only area that is definitely off-limits is employees’ personal laptops and hard drives.

How Do You Know?

If you’re using a company-owned computer, it’s probably a good idea to assume your activity is being monitored. And unless you’re using encrypted e-mail, you should try to avoid using your work e-mail address for personal correspondence. If that’s not realistic, then a good rule of thumb is to read every e-mail before you send it, and think about how your boss might react if he or she were reading it.

In most cases you can detect monitoring software the same way as other spyware. Any application firewall, such as Norton or McAfee, should be able to find unauthorized applications on your computer. Of course, in the case of monitoring by your employer, it’s likely that IT installed the monitoring app and has therefore set up rules to allow the application to work with your firewall while remaining invisible in the background.

Some antispyware programs can detect and even remove keyloggers. If you install a program like , you’ll probably be able to figure out whether you’re being monitored.

If a spyware scan isn’t revealing anything and you’re still apprehensive, you can check for any suspicious processes that are running. It’s hard to weed out the normal processes from the foreign ones, however, unless the invasive program creates an obvious folder or process (YouAreBeingWatched.exe). And some monitoring software, uses rootkit techniques, so you can’t even see its processes or files. Hit Ctrl-Alt-Delete and go to the Task Manager to see a list of processes running on your workstation. You may get lucky if you’re really familiar with your computer’s processes, or if the program really does use an obvious name (some programs do).

Of course, the easiest way to find out whether you’re being monitored is just to ask your employers. Ethical considerations will most likely push them to tell you the truth, and they probably know that if they lie it could be grounds for legal trouble later on. The responsible employer should create an Acceptable Use Policy to make what is appropriate in the workplace completely clear. But if you think you’re being watched (and you’re pretty sure it’s not the CIA or your ex), try a standard spyware detection program or monitor your computer’s processes.

If you do find you’re being monitored, depending on the circumstances, you might be able to take legal action against your employer. The only legal limit on workplace surveillance comes in the form of the ECPA (the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, passed in 1986), which prohibits employers from deliberately eavesdropping on personal conversations. The ECPA does not protect any kind of communication except the spoken word, though, so your every action while at work, including personal e-mails, is most likely subject to review by your employer. You might not be able to take your employer to court for watching you at work, but at least you’ll know to quit spending so much time playing on the company dime.

Can Employers Monitor Employee Emails?

Posted on July 11th, 2016 in anywheremonitor, Computer and Internet monitoring, Employee Monitoring | Comments Off on Can Employers Monitor Employee Emails?

Even though a lot of companies have set up email policies for their employees, the trend of using the office Internet for receiving and sending non-work-related emails continues. Which makes many of us wonder whether employers can monitor employee emails or not?

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Many employees are under the misconception that their employers do not have the right to monitor the emails and websites that they access through the workplace Internet. Employees also tend to incorrectly believe that their use and access of emails is private, and should not be breached by employers. However, the law appears to think differently on this matter.

In a world where trade secrets and business information are treated as ‘Intellectual Property’, it should come as no surprise that the emails being sent from the office is being surveilled. If employers can make their employees sign a nondisclosure and confidentiality agreement, they are well within their rights to monitor the office emails of their employees as well.

Is Email Monitoring Legal?

In the past, multiple lawsuits have been filed by employees against private employers, based on invasion of privacy rights and the Fourth Amendment’s prohibition of ‘unreasonable searches and seizures’ by government agents, government employers, and supervisors. The courts have sided with employers, and deemed the act of monitoring employee emails an employer privilege, provided a notice is given to the employees about this company practice.

In 2000, the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit upheld the right of the employer to conduct electronic audits as per its company policy. In the Federal District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania case of Michael A. Smyth vs. The Pillsbury Company, 914 F. Supp. 97 (E.D. Pa. 1996), using the grounds of balancing-of-interests test, the court decided in favor of the company’s interest, thereby allowing employers to prevent inappropriate and unprofessional behavior pertaining to email communications or Internet usage by employees. Thus, employees can claim no right to privacy for non-work-related activities being carried out at the workplace, especially if the employer has disallowed employees from doing so through an email and Internet policy.

Employers Must Have An Email Policy

The employer must have a clearly written email policy in place, and must notify the employees of their practice of monitoring employee emails. Thus, once the employees have been notified about the company policy on monitoring emails, they cannot claim rights under reasonable expectation of privacy.

Companies that impose such monitoring must maintain an employee handbook that explicitly mentions the company’s policies on email monitoring and other restrictions. Such a handbook usually explains in detail about the extent of monitoring being practiced by the company. It also informs the employees not to expect privacy while dealing with emails during work. Such a handbook stating the company’s policy is considered to be a sufficient step towards notifying the employees.

Federal Law Allows Email Monitoring
The federal law of Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) does not afford employees the privilege of claiming privacy protection for non-work-related emails and Internet usage. The email can be intercepted, as long as it is in transit, and emails can be audited as well. However, the ECPA restricts employers for intentionally intercepting emails that are stored on the computer server. This ban on email interception has three exceptions, which gives companies the right to monitor the emails of their employee. The following exceptions that allow monitoring employee usage of emails are:

  1. Consent exception: When the employee reads and acknowledges the email monitoring policy given by the employer.
  2. Provider exception: The employer must be the sole provider of the system on which the employee works, and not a third-party servicer. Therefore, employers are allowed to examine emails on the systems provided by them to the employees.
  3. Ordinary-course-of-business exception: This exception allows employers to monitor emails sent during the ordinary course of a workday, and includes both work-related and personal emails that were sent from an office system.

The aforementioned exceptions and the employer’s right to intercept emails were enforced in the 1993 case of Bourke vs. Nissan Motor Corp., in U.S.A., in which Nissan won the case. Using intercepted emails, Nissan was able to prove that it had not violated the privacy or unfairly dismissed two employees for sharing sexually explicit emails at the workplace.

Employers must not delay in implementing such an email policy, as such a policy can act as a handy tool against privacy claims, and prevents sensitive business information from being breached or leaked.

So that means, as the owner, we could choose some employee monitoring software, like the iMonitor EAM or iMonitor Keylogger Pro,  to help you improve employee work efficiency and productivity.

How to Monitor Your Employees’ PCs Without Going Too Far?

Posted on July 4th, 2016 in Employee Monitoring, IMonitor Softwares | Comments Off on How to Monitor Your Employees’ PCs Without Going Too Far?

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Do you know what your employees are doing on the Web? At a minimum, they’re probably goofing off watching YouTube videos. At worst, they could be steering your company toward financial ruin. In this quick guide, I’ll show you how to keep an eye on employee Internet use and monitor just about everything else they do with their PCs.

I can already hear the groans of disgruntled readers as I type these words (and if you’re worried about privacy at work, you have ways to stop your boss from spying on you). But gone are the days when PC monitoring was an optional, draconian security measure practiced only by especially vigilant organizations. Today, more than three-quarters of U.S. companies monitor employee Internet use. If your business is in the remaining quarter that doesn’t do so, you’re probably overdue for a policy change.

Why You Should Monitor
Everything your team does on company time–and on company resources–matters. Time spent on frivolous Websites can seriously hamper productivity, and visiting objectionable sites on company PCs can subject your business to serious legal risks, including costly harassment suits from staffers who may be exposed to offensive content.

That doesn’t look like work to me. iMonitor can give you a real-time look at employees’ screens.
Other consequences may be far worse than mere productivity loss or a little legal hot water. Either unintentionally or maliciously, employees can reveal proprietary information, jeopardizing business strategy, customer confidentiality, data integrity, and more.
And, of course, unchecked Web activity can expose your network and systems to dangers from malware and other intrusions. Even something as simple as a worker’s failure to keep up with Windows patches can be a threat to your business, so don’t think of monitoring as merely snooping.

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Employee Monitoring Software
Employee monitoring is just one facet of a larger discipline known as endpoint security, which includes everything from malware protection to policy enforcement and asset tracking. Large enterprise computing environments demand comprehensive endpoint-security systems, consisting of server software coupled with client software on each user’s machine, that can handle many of these functions at once. These systems tend to be complex enough to require the expertise of a trained IT pro. But in this guide, I’ll be looking primarily at simpler tools designed for smaller organizations.

For a small business, you have several good ways to achieve endpoint security. You can install a Web-hosted system that combines software on the PC with remote monitoring services to protect your computers and enforce compliance with company policies. You can combine a few complementary tools, such as a desktop security suite and professional tracking software. Or, if your company is very small and your budget is tight, you can adopt free tools à la carte.

Symantec’s cloud-based endpoint-protection service can monitor all of your company’s PCs with minimal setup time.
The most secure way to monitor PC use is to deploy a system that consists of a host, server, or appliance together with client-installed software. Unless you have a dedicated IT staff or the budget to bring someone in on a regular basis to check on things, a cloud-based service–such as Symantec.cloud or Trend Micro Worry-Free Business Security–is probably the best choice. These services are relatively inexpensive and easy to set up compared with server offerings, and they give you the flexibility to set and monitor compliance with acceptable-use policies from a single management interface. They also deploy system security updates automatically, block malware, and protect sensitive files to prevent data from leaking out of your company. Better still, these hosted systems effectively protect laptops that frequently leave the office.
The cost for a hosted endpoint-security service is generally very low: A five-client license for Trend Micro Worry-Free will set you back less than $300 for two years.

If you’re not up for a total security overhaul and you just want to track user activity on a few systems, you have several affordable ways to go about it. Packages such as Interguard Sonar can monitor all e-mail and IM sessions, track and filter Web usage, log users’ keystrokes and program use, and capture screenshots on command for as little as $87 per user.

If you’re really on a shoestring budget, plenty of free and open-source tools can log PC and Web use. A freebie called iMonitor, for instance, can keep tabs on which applications your staffers are using and which sites they’re visiting, complete with simple reports that give you a pretty clear idea as to how employees are spending their time on their PCs. A word of caution on stand-alone tools, though: Some antimalware utilities can quickly identify and disable stand-alone monitoring tools, so you may need to create an exception in your malware protection settings to ensure that iMonitor can work properly on your systems.

Best Practices
It should go without saying that employee monitoring ought to be just one small component in a comprehensive strategy to protect your business and maintain productivity. Once you’ve made the choice to monitor, you should follow these general guidelines to ensure your success.

Be forthright: Nobody likes being spied on unwittingly. Unless you think someone on your team poses a serious threat that requires covert monitoring, it’s best to be up front with staffers about what you track and why. Many companies accomplish this with a simple statement in the employee handbook telling workers plainly that everything they do on company computers, including individual keystrokes, can and will be tracked. Letting employees know that their behavior is being monitored can serve as a powerful deterrent against unwanted online activity.

Filter proactively: Most good endpoint-security tools include Web and e-mail content filters that can block inappropriate sites and prevent users from sending or receiving files that can jeopardize your business. Use them. By limiting the ways your staffers can get into trouble, you can prevent problems up front.

Check reports regularly: There’s little point in generating usage reports if you’re not going to look at them. Take the time to at least spot-check the reports that your monitoring software generates so that you can identify potential problems early and take remedial action. Whatever you discover–whether it’s a time-wasting Website that everyone is watching this week or a single person who is addicted to solitaire–you can often fix problems with a simple e-mail that tells your team you know what’s up: “Just a reminder, people: Chatroulette is not an appropriate use of company time.”

How to Effectively Manage Remote Employees

Posted on June 30th, 2016 in Employee Monitoring | Comments Off on How to Effectively Manage Remote Employees

Management is nothing more than motivating other people.
– Lee Iacocca

In an organization, a conference call was going on between the different team members, some of whom were located at the headquarters, while others had joined in from remote regional offices. The manager kept on distinguishing between the people working from the headquarters and the regional offices by using the phrase “us and them” throughout the call. This led to bias among the team members. A good manager would have ensured that all the team members were treated as equals and addressed in the same way.

Managing remotely located employees can be a task in itself. Not only is it difficult to keep a tab on the work of the remote employees, the assessment of their performance can also be tedious. Often, remote employees harbor emotions of distrust, demotivation, perceived unfairness, and lack of appreciation for their efforts.

As a manager, you will have to ensure that you engage remote employees, and encourage them to approach you with their problems. You should let go of your fear of ‘what are they doing at work?’ as long as they achieve the desired results. This Buzzle article intends to make you aware about effective remote employee management.

 
Tips for Effective Remote Employee Management
 
Communicate Your Goals
It is important that all employees, whether at headquarters, a remote location, or working from home, be aware about the goals of the organization, and the teams they represent. If this is not clear, they may not feel motivated to work collectively towards the accomplishment of the goals. This is especially crucial for employees working from regional offices or home, as they should be aware about the long-term and short-term goals of the organization.
 
Be Result Oriented
It is important that you have a result-oriented approach when dealing with employees who are not located near you. Whatever the task you allot them, you should ensure that it gets completed before the deadline. For this, you may ask them to report their progress to you every day. This will not only help keep a tab on the completion of work, but also allow you to give feedback from time to time to reduce re-work. Also, gone are the days when managers dictated the employees to work as they pleased. Accord them the freedom of working creatively, as long as they achieve the desired result.

Effective Communication
It is important that all the team members are on the same page. Hence, it is crucial that there is effective communication between all the team members. This can be done with the help of video conferencing, teleconferencing, email, chat, phone messengers, etc. You can also share files easily through Skype. There are various software which will help assign tasks to the employees. This will not only allow remote employees to stay in touch with the rest of the team, but it will also foster clarity in communication.

Clarity in Responsibilities
If you expect the remotely-located employees to read your mind, then you are going to be sorely disappointed. Give them a clear picture of your expectations. There should be absolutely no ambiguity in the roles and responsibilities of the remote employees, because they are not present at headquarters. Any misunderstanding in duties can cause a delay in the completion of a task. Hence, it is important that they have clarity about their duties and responsibilities.

Insist on Collaboration
It may so happen that employees located at remote locations may be left out during meetings and discussions. Hence, you will have to ensure that there is some collective interaction of the team through a conference call every day. It can be sharing of innovative ideas, or something related to work. It is essential that there is regular interaction between the entire team so that the company benefits from the collaboration.

Translate Organizational Culture
All the employees, including the remotely located ones, should be aware of the organizational culture. They should know about the values, policies, and work ethics followed by the organization. Newsletters, magazines, employee engagement, and announcement emails, etc., of the organization should reach these employees as well. As a manager, it is your duty to make remote employees aware about the organizational culture, which should be uniform throughout the entire organization.

Express Trust
Make it a point that you appreciate the efforts of the remote staff from time to time, to engage them and build trust. Express your belief in their talent, values, and work ethics. This will help strengthen the bond between both the teams. Not only will it motivate the remote employees, but it will also encourage them to put in their best efforts. Whenever possible, try to reward good work executed by remote employees. This will help you to build trust.

Give Regular Feedback
As these employees are at different locations, there may be chances that the work may not get completed as required. Hence, it is advisable to set objectives, monitor the executed work, and give feedback for it. By giving suggestions or feedback, you will be able to control the flow of work as well as its accuracy. Moreover, timely feedback will ensure that the work is on the right track.

Have Standardization
Whether it is policies, procedures, or processes, ensure that they are standardized throughout the organization. You cannot be biased when it comes to policies. If an employee who is working at a remote location gets warning about being lax at work, the same policy should also apply to people working at headquarters as well. Also, if you have the work flow or process documented, it will help remotely-stationed employees to follow the process and hierarchy. This will help in smooth functioning of the work.

Be Accessible
While in an office you can always stop by an employee’s desk and have a chat with him; this may not be possible for a remotely located employee. Schedule a telephone call, or send an email every now and then to inquire about him. Don’t let distance lead to ‘Out of sight, out of mind’. Whenever the employees need your help, you must be available-by phone, email, SMS or video conference. As the employees are located at a distance, it becomes even more important for you to be available for them whenever they need to consult you for flawless completion of tasks.

Help them in Networking
While water cooler conversations are not possible in case of remote employees, it is important that the team members network with each other to improve the strength of the team. This can be done through the company’s social intranet or get-togethers, which should be arranged every few months. You can even set up an intranet team page or build a virtual team room. You can celebrate e-birthdays, share photos, personal information, etc. You can even use webcams to communicate with each other. This will also lead to some informal conversation and bonding among the team members.

Detect and Resolve Problems
Sometimes, you may observe a drop in the performance, lack of motivation, unresponsiveness, dissatisfaction with work, improper tone of communication, etc., in a remote employee. All these are indicators of a problem. You will have to interact with the employee and inquire about his problems related to work. Many times due to rumors, like the employees in headquarters being given a higher raise or better opportunities for career advancement, there is a general dissatisfaction and feeling of injustice among remotely located employees. You will have to speak to them and resolve their problems and issues.

The key to managing remotely-located employees is to engage them. If the employees speak in a different language, ensure that the others talk slowly during the conference call. This will help them to comprehend the language. Be sensitive towards their language preference. Ensure that you are always in touch with remotely located employees. You must make them aware that their contribution is important for the growth of the organization. Give them performance-based rewards, and appreciate their good work. Many times, remote employees feel isolated and lose motivation; you will have to inspire them to work efficiently by using your leadership skills.

iMonitor Found A Wolf In Sheep’s Clothing

Posted on June 29th, 2016 in EAM Professional Edition, Employee Monitoring, IMonitor Softwares | Comments Off on iMonitor Found A Wolf In Sheep’s Clothing

Ok, I know that it’s not every office that has a decenter in it, but I suspected that I had an employee who was passing off what I will call “trade secrets” from my office to another company. Now, I’m not the person who won’t let employees leave to go work for someone else. I mean, if you want a new job, that’s cool. However, when you are passing information to a competitor hoping for a lucrative job offer, that’s something I cannot abide.

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Anyways, the office manager and I had ideas about who this “mole” could be, but we were not sure. When everyone went home for the day, we went through and installed the employee monitoring software on every computer in the office and kept constant watch for emails and such from the guilty party to a competitor. Oddly enough, we found that there were many instances of a lack of productivity, but there was nothing that seemed troublesome.

After a few days, we wondered if were just being paranoid. Instead of uninstalling the software, we simply let the software keep working for a little while longer. It was one day that we saw an odd configuration of typing that seemed like it was going in a word document. We figured it was a code, and when we confronted the employee over this alleged “code” the employee confessed.

Unfortunately, we had to let the employee go. At least they had another job waiting for them, but we’re glad that we downloaded the software. Afterwards, we simply let the program go and did not inform the staff. However, with everyone wondering if they were being monitored, productivity improved over the next few weeks. We wanted to catch a “mole”, but we also get more out of our employees at the same time.

We have iMonitor to thank for the advanced performance of our business!

Spy on My Husband’s Computer

Posted on June 23rd, 2016 in Mac Keylogger | Comments Off on Spy on My Husband’s Computer

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If, like many out there, you have a If, like many out there, you have a sneaking suspicion that your husband may be up to no good and may be playing around, you might be interested in knowing how you can spy on his text messages?suspicion that your husband may be up to no good and may be playing around, you might be interested in knowing how you can spy on his E-mail and Facebook ?

It’s quite often obvious that a cheating husband would be using his E-mail to contact the other party, whether by making direct Facebook message with them, or more often than not, by Facebook messages that they think are a safe way of communicating because they can be instantly deleted from the cell phone’s history. At the same time, incoming text messages from a secret lover can also be instantly deleted after reading, so even getting hold of his phone is not going to give you any clues about his cheating behavior.

The good news is, due to technological advances in software, there is now a way that you can monitor your husband’s computer – and even his E-mail and Facebook, if you want to go that far.

I’m not going to go into the legal issues, here. Suffice to say that in many countries and states it would be deemed illegal to spy on somebody else’s computer without their permission. I’ll leave it up to you to find out your own particular laws where you live. There are also disclaimers, warnings and further legal advice at the websites of the vendors of these products. Let me just point out that it certainly is not illegal to buy such spying programs – you just need to be careful at how you use them.

That said, the products themselves nowadays are very reliable and come with a variety of functions and applications. Once downloaded to the target computer, you will be able to get information sent to a secure online server from where you can retrieve it all whenever you wish and at your own pace. And you can do this from anywhere in the world using whatever internet-ready device that you have to hand – including your own mobile phone.

You may frequently see that there are a number of Windows devices monitor software, however, you can hardly find a monitor software for Mac.

Fortunately, now we found a Mac Monitoring Software, which can record email, chat, keystrokes, screenshots, website and other all user activities on Mac computer.

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Usually, the kinds of things you can monitor vary depending on how much you want to pay. At the lower end, a basic package would give you the limited ability to spy only few things, or have limited data saving time. But Mac Keylogger is different, the different plan just have using time different. The function is all the same.

Another aspect of all of this that you should know about is that once installed on the target Mac, the software that does all of this monitoring for you is completely invisible to the user. He won’t know that it’s there and will have no way of knowing that you now have a secret window on his world that is revealing all his cheating ways to you.

I hope I’ve given a little insight into what these spying programs can do and how they work. Many thousands of cheated on people have found out the truth of the matter by using these techniques, and this has then enabled them to do whatever they need to do about the situation and get on with their lives. If you need to know how to monitor your cheating husband’s E-mail and Facebook, this is probably the cheapest, quickest and most anonymous ways of doing it and it simply works. No more misery, no more guesswork and no more anxiety from wondering what he’s been getting up to all the time – this will help you get to the truth – and FAST!

 

 

Confidential Crisis

Posted on June 21st, 2016 in EAM Professional Edition, Employee Monitoring, IMonitor Softwares | Comments Off on Confidential Crisis

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NEW YORK, March 16 (Reuters) – A former Federal Reserve Bank of New York employee was spared prison on Wednesday, disappointing prosecutors who said his leaking of confidential documents to a friend at Goldman Sachs Group Inc (GS.N) justified time behind bars.

Jason Gross, 37, was fined $2,000 by U.S. Magistrate Judge Gabriel Gorenstein in Manhattan and sentenced to a year of probation with 200 hours of community service after pleading guilty to a misdemeanor charge of theft of government property.

Prosecutors had sought six to 12 months in prison for Gross, who in November admitted to providing confidential information to Rohit Bansal, his former supervisor at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York who had left to work at Goldman Sachs.

But while Gorenstein said Gross had abused the position of trust he had at the New York Fed, his conviction coupled with the loss of a career had already sent “a powerful message to others.”

The case highlighted the so-called revolving door on Wall Street, in which regulators take new jobs at the banks they formerly oversaw.

The charges were announced after Goldman Sachs agreed in October to a related $50 million settlement with the New York Department of Financial Services.

According to prosecutors and New York regulators, Bansal obtained numerous documents from Gross after joining Goldman Sachs in July 2014.

Those documents included some pertaining to examinations of a bank that Goldman was advising about a potential transaction, regulators said.

Bansal shared some of the documents with others at Goldman, regulators and prosecutors said, telling them in at least one instance, “Please don’t distribute.”

In court, Bruce Barket, Gross’s lawyer, said Gross in providing Bansal the documents thought he was doing a favor for a friend who had already seen them and even created some.

“I don’t think he thought much of it,” Barket said.

Goldman has said that after discovering Bansal obtained the confidential supervisory information, it notified regulators and fired him and a more senior employee who failed to take further action. The New York Fed also fired Gross.

Bansal pleaded guilty in November to theft of government property. He is scheduled to be sentenced on Tuesday.

Illegally disclosing customer’s data or companies’ confidential by employee is happening all the time at companies everywhere. In order to prevent the unethical behavior,  the companies should do the following:

  1. Enhance education on the code of conduct in the business and confidential agreement.
  2. Strengthen security of customer archives and business confidential, preventing from any losing.
  3. The employee monitoring software is necessary, which can prevent confidential crisis and grantee data security. Help companies take steps before the data losing.

The monitoring software is just one means to keep the customer’s data and companies’ confidential safe. The more actions like optimize the management system and improve the staffs’ comprehensive quality are the key point to reduce data leaking happened.